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11/1/10

An article distributed by the Associated Press reports on an installation in the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, "Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture," the first major museum exhibit to show how sexual orientation and gender identity have shaped American art. The installation is co-curated by Jonathan Katz, associate professor of visual studies and director of the department's new doctoral program. The article appeared in news outlets around the country, including the San Diego Union Tribune, Los Angeles Times, CBS News, Salon, The Washington Post and the Buffalo News.

11/2/10

An article on NewsMedical.Net reports researchers at UB have developed a novel technology using quantum dots that is expected to have major implications for research and treatment of tuberculosis, as well as other inflammatory lung diseases. Articles also appear on Health Canal, PhysOrg, Science Blog and Science Daily.

11/2/10

An article on Smart Planet reports researchers speaking today at the Geological Society of America meeting will be raising another concern to the controversial practice of hydraulic fracturing: uranium contamination. The article notes that geologists from UB scanned shale surfaces taken from Pennsylvania and Western New York to create a chemical map of the rock, revealing that its uranium and hydrocarbons were located together. The article quotes Tracy Banks, assistant professor of geology. Articles on Greenwire and Gant Daily also interview Banks on the issue.

11/2/10

C-Span and C-Span 2 are airing coverage of last week's visit to UB by William Dudley, the 10th president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, who discussed "How Goes the Recovery? Challenges for the Nation, the Region and the Fed." Coverage also includes presentation by the president of Delta Sigma Pi, a UB professional business fraternity, of a commemorative presidential coin featuring U.S. President Millard Fillmore, founder of UB who served as the university's first chancellor in 1846, and a commemorative pen.

11/3/10

The Canadian media picked up the Associated Press article about an installation in the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, "Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture," co-curated by Jonathan Katz, associate professor of visual studies. The article appeared in news outlets throughout Canada, including The Canadian Press, Metro News Edmonton, Metro News Toronto, 660 News and Winnipeg Free Press.

11/5/10

An article distributed by the Associated Press about Jesse L. Martin, who played Detective Ed Green on "Law & Order," interviews him about his role in the new Broadway production of "The Merchant of Venice," and reports that he got hooked on Shakespeare growing up in Buffalo, where, in exchange for acting classes at UB, he spent his summers building sets and hanging lights for Shakespeare in the Park productions. The article appeared in news outlets throughout the U.S. and Canada, including Cineplex.com, San Diego Union Tribune, The Canadian Press, ABC News and the Huffington Post.

11/5/10

An article in the Chicago Sun Times about the new television programs that have emerged during the economic downturn – "16 and Pregnant," "Downsized," "Fairy Jobmother" and "Design on a Dime" – quotes Elayne Rapping, professor emeritus of American studies, who said, "TV producers are more in tune now that people are in bad shape. I don't think it's changed the TV landscape forever, nor has it changed it completely. There will still be an awful lot of shows with incredibly, obscenely ostentatious lifestyles."

11/5/10

An article on Health Canal reports a UB social work doctoral candidate's experiences rescuing women from the sex trade in India has influenced her studies and her determination to free the women from sexual servitude.

11/5/10

An article in The Washington Post reviews "Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture," organized by Jonathan D. Katz, associate professor and director of the visual studies doctoral program. The article calls the exhibition, which is mounted in the National Portrait Gallery, "one of the best thematic exhibitions in years."

11/6/10

An article in the New York Post about the truth behind old sayings reports a team led by Mark Seery, assistant professor of psychology, followed 2,398 subjects over three years and found that people who faced moderate levels of adversity were better off emotionally than those who never experienced hardships, proving the old adage, what doesn't kill you makes you stronger.

11/8/10

An article in Newsweek about head injuries servicemen and women are facing when they return from Afghanistan and Iraq and the struggles doctors are having to treat their physical and psychological symptoms quotes Barry Willer, UB professor of psychiatry and rehabilitation medicine, and an expert on concussions. "Headaches are almost useless as a diagnostic," he said, for troops who are coming home with myriad medical issues.

11/8/10

A story on NPR about the anti-abortion group Operation Save America and its Old West-style "wanted" posters targeting doctors who perform abortions interviewed Lucinda Finley, professor of law. The story aired on NPR stations around the nation, including WBFO-FM, Oregon Public Broadcasting, Georgia Public Broadcasting, Minnesota Public Radio and Vermont Public Radio.

11/9/10

A story on MarketWatch's Consumer Confidential reports studies consistently show that consumers are adverse to impulsive over-spending when they use cash, and that a new report by Satheeshkumar Seenivasan, a School of Management doctoral candidate, and others found a correlation between eating so-called "vice" foods with how you pay for it.

11/9/10

Elayne Rapping, professor emeritus of American studies, is quoted in a New York Daily News story about a new line of high-end French lingerie that is held together with magnets. "At first thought, it seems kind of gimmicky," she said. "But there may be women who'll buy it thinking it will make them sexier."

11/9/10

Charles Lindsey, assistant professor of marketing, is quoted in an article in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle that reports Xerox Corp. has signed a five-year agreement to be a sponsor of the U.S. Open tennis tournament. "A large part of their business model is business-to-business," he said. "It could be they're trying to promote this image that it's an elite company. That fits well with tennis."

11/9/10

A story on My Health News Daily reports a study has found that isoflavones in soy can decrease the risk of developing certain types of breast cancer, and quotes Anne Weaver, a UB graduate student. The research contradicts other studies showing an increased risk of cancer with soy consumption, she said. The research also is the subject of articles on PhysOrg, Science Centric and Health Canal, and an article distributed by the South Asian news service ANI.

11/8/10

An article on Health News Digest reports on research by Yu-Ping Chang, assistant professor of nursing, that looks at the unique challenges experienced by Chinese families when confronting Alzheimer's disease. An article also appeared on PhysOrg.

11/9/10

An article distributed by HealthDay news service reports on a new study that found that the more isoflavone-containing soy products a young woman eats, the lower her odds for developing invasive breast cancers, and quotes lead author of the study, Anne Weaver, a UB graduate students and a research apprentice with Roswell Park Cancer Institute. The article appears in news outlets that include BusinessWeek, MSN Health & Fitness and U.S. News & World Report. Articles also appeared on Science Daily, Food Consumer and BioScholar.

11/10/10

Gary Giovino, professor and chair of the Department of Community Health and Health Behavior and an expert in the patterns, consequences and control of tobacco use, was interviewed by USA Today for a story about a Food and Drug Administration proposal to include graphic images and stern warnings about the dangers of smoking on all cigarette packs by October 2012. " PBS NewsHour also interviewed Giovino on the new packages.

11/10/10

Elayne Rapping, professor emeritus of American studies, is quoted in an article in the Christian Science Monitor about Bristol Palin's performances on Dancing with the Stars and the role her mother's political supporters might be playing in keeping the teen on the show. Tea Party activists on Twitter "are part of a large community that has power, and when the group of people with this power decide to put it in the service of Bristol Palin, it's kind of mind-boggling," she said.

11/9/10

Nancy J. Smyth, dean of the School of Social Work, was interviewed on Social Work Career Transition Blog about her career, why she chose the social work profession, what she enjoys most about her work and advice for up and coming social workers.

11/12/10

An article in USA Today reports on a new study that found that the more isoflavone-containing soy products a young woman eats, the lower her odds for developing invasive breast cancers, and quotes lead author of the study, Anne Weaver, a UB graduate students and a research apprentice with Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

11/13/10

An article distributed by the Associated Press about the legal challenges being waged over New York State's efforts to tax Native American smoke shop sales to non-Indian customers quotes Stuart Lazar, associate professor of law and a specialist in tax issues, and Don Grinde, professor and chair of American studies. The article appeared throughout the U.S. and Canada in outlets that include The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, ABC News, Bloomberg Businessweek, Huffington Post and the independent Indian news outlet, Native American Times.

11/13/10

A story on NPR reports on "Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture" currently on exhibit in the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, and interviews Jonathan Katz, associate professor of visual studies and an eminent queer studies scholar, who co-curated the landmark exhibition. The exhibition also is the subject of articles in Out magazine and the Los Angeles Times.

11/16/10

A story on American Public Radio's Marketplace looks at why it costs more to eat healthier and reports a UB study found that if you lower the cost of healthy food, shoppers will use the money they save to buy more chips and cookies.

11/17/10

An article in the International Business Times reports a recent study has found that energy drinks are strongly associated with increased risks for heavy drinking and alcohol dependency, and quotes Kathleen Miller research scientist at the Research Institute on Addictions. "Caffeine does not antagonize or cancel out the impairment associated with drunkenness – it merely disguises the more obvious markers of that impairment, she said. Articles also appeared on Science Daily, PhyOrg and ZME Science. The news service Asian News International also distributed an article on the findings.

11/17/10

Elayne Rapping, professor emeritus of American studies, is quoted in an article in the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review about U.S. reaction to the announced engagement of Prince William to Kate Middleton. "Americans," she said, "are going to eat this up."

11/18/10

An article in The Wall Street Journal about the questions that remain over how Gov.-elect Andrew Cuomo will deal with many key issues, including the state's rapidly growing deficit, reports that as a candidate he was supportive of the stalled effort to expand UB, but was vague on whether he favored a broader regulatory overhaul of public higher education that would give state colleges more authority to raise tuition and set budgets on their own.

11/19/10

An article in the Youngstown Business Journal about protests over plans to drill for oil and natural gas in an affluent Ohio neighborhood reports the group's website features resources about the environmental hazards of fracking, including a UB study that found the process could unearth uranium naturally trapped inside the shale.

11/19/10

An article on England's Multiple Sclerosis Trust on the recent meeting of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis, the largest annual international conference devoted to basic and clinical research in MS, reports Robert Zivadinov, professor of neurology, presented research that showed a higher prevalence of CCSVI among people with secondary progressive MS, but "Our findings point against CCSVI having a primary causative role in the development of MS."

11/18/10

An article titled "How to build a better student" in the Toronto Globe and Mail reports Ming Ming Chiu, professor of learning and instruction, recommends chatting with your kids about political and social events, especially when there's math involved.

11/17/10

An article in Financial Times about China's cultural collision between its authoritarian politics and the freedom of the Internet quotes Junhao Hong, professor of communication and an expert on Chinese free speech on the web.

11/19/10

An article in The New York Times about a study that showed that high levels of fearlessness in 3- and 4-year-old children is strongly associated with aggression and a lack of empathy quotes Jamie Ostrov, assistant professor of psychology. He says that children at the extreme end of the fearless spectrum "may be charming, but they're also highly manipulative and deceptive and skilled at getting their way – even at ages 3 or 4."

11/19/10

An article in Crain's New York Business calls New York City the No. 1 destination in the nation for international students, and reports that UB is among three New York universities ranked in the Top 20 of U.S. institutions that host the most international students.

11/20/10

An article in the Wheeling Intelligencer about a conference held at the University of Pittsburgh titled "Health Effects of Shale Gas Extraction" quotes Tracy Banks, assistant professor of geology, who told the group that uranium is being mobilized by the fracking process. "Concentrations are fairly low," she said of uranium's presence in the water used to frack a well, "but they are high enough that it should not be treated like your drinking water.

11/22/10

An article in CSP Magazine about a public hearing on banning menthol cigarettes reports a ban could create a black market for the product and quotes Gary Giovino, professor and chair of community health and health behavior. "Mentholated cigarettes are at least as dangerous as their non-mentholated varieties, and there is concern about menthol sweetening the poison," he said.

11/22/10

An article in the Chronicle of Higher Education's Wired Campus section looks at the new mobile app Serendipitor, created by Mark Shepard, assistant professor of architecture and media studies, which, rather than providing the shortest distance between two points, generates a circuitous trip plan that actually encourages users to get lost along the way.

11/22/10

An article on Dentistry iQ reports Robert Genco, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Oral Biology, is co-editor "Periodontal Disease and Overall Health: A Clinician's Guide," a new textbook that features 18 chapters of information regarding the relationship between oral and systemic diseases.

11/15/10

Articles on CBS New York, Smart Money and KTVK-TV in Phoenix report on a new study that found that people who pay for food with credit cards are more likely to buy junk than those paying with cash. The study was conducted by Satheeshkumar Seenivasan, a School of Management doctoral student, and others.

11/24/10

An article in the online research-news magazine Miller-McCune about the Stop TB Partnership, an effort to call attention to tuberculosis as the leading cause of death among persons infected with HIV in Africa, quotes Gene Morse, associate dean of clinical pharmacology, who discussed the tendency of the diseases to occur together and the differences in the way each is treated.

11/29/10

An article in the Albany Times Union's Capitol Confidential blog looks at Assemblyman Mark Schroeder's unhappiness with Sheldon Silver's leadership, particularly the way Assembly Democrats rebuffed efforts to give SUNY more autonomy, and includes a letter Schroeder wrote to Assemblywoman Deborah Glick in which he questioned her "close attention" to issues important to Upstate New York, noting that, "Perhaps you were correct in asserting that these initiatives were not ignored. It is, after all, awfully difficult to strangle the life out of something unless you pay it at least some attention."

11/29/10

Coverage on C-SPAN of a local appearance this fall by U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts includes a question by a UB law student, who asked Roberts if it is difficult to write opinions if you disagree with prior rulings.

11/28/10

Dennis Maher, a clinical assistant professor of architecture, was the focus of a short feature in Rust Wire, a website that covers news across the Rust Belt. Maher's work was also featured on sites including the Architectural League of New York's Urban Omnibus forum.