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Identification of N-acylhomoserine lactones in mucopurulent respiratory secretions from cystic fibrosis patients. - PubMed - NCBI
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FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2005 Mar 15;244(2):297-304.

Identification of N-acylhomoserine lactones in mucopurulent respiratory secretions from cystic fibrosis patients.

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1
Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary Health Sciences Centre, Calgary, Alta., Canada T2N 4N1.

Abstract

Pseudomonas aeruginosa and species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are the primary bacterial pathogens contributing to lung disease in patients with cystic fibrosis. Quorum sensing systems using N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules are involved in the regulation of a number of virulence factors in these species. Extracts of mucopurulent respiratory secretions from 13 cystic fibrosis patients infected with P. aeruginosa and/or strains of the B. cepacia complex were fractionated using reverse-phase fast pressure liquid chromatography and analyzed for the presence of AHLs using a traI-luxCDABE-based reporter that responds to AHLs with acyl chains ranging between 4 and 12 carbons. Using this assay system, a broad range of AHLs were detected and identified despite being present at low concentrations in limited sample volumes. N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, N-(3-oxo-decanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (OHL) were the AHLs most frequently identified. OHL and N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone were detected in nanomolar concentrations compared to picomolar amounts of the 3-oxo-derivatives of the AHLs identified.

PMID:
15766782
DOI:
10.1016/j.femsle.2005.01.055
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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