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1.
Figure 3.

Figure 3. From: Bacteria Inside Semiconductors as Potential Sensor Elements: Biochip Progress.

Flowchart representing nucleation, growth, and separation of bio-crystals.

Vasu R. Sah, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jun;14(6):11225-11244.
2.
Figure 8.

Figure 8. From: Bacteria Inside Semiconductors as Potential Sensor Elements: Biochip Progress.

Following the same pattern as in —MAIR-IR Spectra—A, B, C.

Vasu R. Sah, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jun;14(6):11225-11244.
3.
Figure 6.

Figure 6. From: Bacteria Inside Semiconductors as Potential Sensor Elements: Biochip Progress.

Exposures for more than 4 days showed corrosion crystals without bacterial entrapment.

Vasu R. Sah, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jun;14(6):11225-11244.
4.
Figure 1.

Figure 1. From: Bacteria Inside Semiconductors as Potential Sensor Elements: Biochip Progress.

Germania-Pseudomonas syzgii compound crystals first observed forming in the University of Arizona fabrication facility in the year 2000.

Vasu R. Sah, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jun;14(6):11225-11244.
5.
Figure 7.

Figure 7. From: Bacteria Inside Semiconductors as Potential Sensor Elements: Biochip Progress.

SEM images (A) pH = 5.5 at flow rate of 1 mL/min; Normal UPW pH = 7 (B) flow rate of 1 mL/min (C) flow rate of 2.5 mL/min and more.

Vasu R. Sah, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jun;14(6):11225-11244.
6.
Figure 5.

Figure 5. From: Bacteria Inside Semiconductors as Potential Sensor Elements: Biochip Progress.

(Inclined SEM—at 75 Degrees): From left to right, showing an inclined SEM nucleation of the bacterial seeding at the center of the deposit, eventually forming bio-crystals.

Vasu R. Sah, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jun;14(6):11225-11244.
7.
Figure 9.

Figure 9. From: Bacteria Inside Semiconductors as Potential Sensor Elements: Biochip Progress.

XPS Spectrum showing the formation of a specific oxide of Ge—GeO2 with Carbon and trace amounts of Si (from the flow cell)—(C1s at 284.6 eV for C-C, 286.4 eV for C-O, 288.6 eV for O=C-O; O1s peak at 531.9 eV for GeO2; Ge3d at 32.7 eV for GeO2; Si2p at 102.2 eV).

Vasu R. Sah, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jun;14(6):11225-11244.
8.
Figure 2.

Figure 2. From: Bacteria Inside Semiconductors as Potential Sensor Elements: Biochip Progress.

SEM images—From Left to Right: (a) Cultured Pseudomonas syzygii using R2A Media (Difco) growing in high quantity; No flow UltraPure Water (UPW) (b) Dried UPW on a Germanium (Ge) prism enclosed inside a Petri dish; (c) Single bacteria seen at various locations of the Ge surface (identical to bacteria in Arizona FAB).

Vasu R. Sah, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jun;14(6):11225-11244.
9.
Figure 4.

Figure 4. From: Bacteria Inside Semiconductors as Potential Sensor Elements: Biochip Progress.

(As observed on the Ge prism)—From (1) Seeding due to the central bacterium in circular deposits (2) Growth of oxide-embedded seeds with bacteria (3) Crystal growth initiation after formation of square oxide moats (3b) Vast number of square oxide moats seen (4) Crystal formation in the center, shape depending upon the deposit morphology. (5) Formation of 3–5 micrometer bacterial crystals—Germanium Oxide crystals, with bacteria in majority of them (Inset).

Vasu R. Sah, et al. Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jun;14(6):11225-11244.

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