University at Buffalo - The State University of New York
Skip to Content
Sensitivity of Candida albicans biofilm cells grown on denture acrylic to antifungal proteins and chlorhexidine. - PubMed - NCBI
Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Arch Oral Biol. 2009 Jun;54(6):588-94. doi: 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2009.01.016. Epub 2009 Feb 27.

Sensitivity of Candida albicans biofilm cells grown on denture acrylic to antifungal proteins and chlorhexidine.

Author information

1
Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Candida albicans cells form biofilms on polymeric surfaces of dentures and other prostheses introduced into the oral cavity. Many biofilm microorganisms exhibit resistance to antimicrobial agents; C. albicans cells may also develop resistance to naturally occurring antifungal peptides in human saliva including histatins (Hsts) and defensins (hBDs). Therefore, we evaluated Hst 5 activity on C. albicans biofilm cells compared to planktonic cells and measured whether surface treatment of denture acrylic with Hst 5, hBD-3, or chlorhexidine gluconate could inhibit in vitro biofilm development.

METHODS:

Acrylic disks were preconditioned with 500 microl saliva for 30 min, and inoculated with C. albicans cells (10(6)cells/ml) for 1h, at 37 degrees C. Non-adherent cells were removed by washing and disks and were incubated in YPD growth medium for 24, 48, and 72 h at 37 degrees C. Candidacidal assays were performed on 48-h-biofilms and on planktonically grown cells using Hst 5 (15.5, 31.25, and 62 microM). Cell adhesion was compared on disks pre-coated with 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, 50 microM Hst 5, or 0.6 microM hBD-3 after 24, 48, and 72 h growth.

RESULTS:

No significant difference was observed in sensitivity to Hst 5 of biofilm cells compared to planktonic cells (p>0.05). Pre-coating disks with hBD-3 did not inhibit biofilm development; however, Hst 5 significantly inhibited biofilm development at 72 h, while 0.12% chlorhexidine significantly inhibited biofilm development at all time intervals (p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

C. albicans biofilm cells grown on denture acrylic are sensitive to killing by Hst 5. Surface coating acrylic with chlorhexidine or Hst 5 effectively inhibits biofilm growth and has potential therapeutic application.

PMID:
19249746
PMCID:
PMC2693315
DOI:
10.1016/j.archoralbio.2009.01.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center