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Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2007 Sep;104(3):385-90. Epub 2006 Dec 4.

Subacute necrotizing sialadenitis: a clinicopathological study.

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1
Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Program, School of Dental Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY 14214, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To report cases of extra-palatal subacute necrotizing sialadenitis (SANS), an uncommon condition that usually affects palatal minor salivary glands, and to characterize the etiopathogenesis, clinical features, and histology of this lesion.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective reviews of records for patients with SANS diagnosed between 1999 and 2005; only cases with complete clinical history and histology were included in the study.

RESULTS:

Five cases (3 women, 2 men) were identified. The majority of patients presented with painful 1.0 to 1.5 cm swellings, with sudden and rapid increase in size. Two cases occurred in the buccal mucosa, 2 on the ventral surface of tongue, and 1 on the upper lip. Histology showed acinar necrosis surrounded by a dense polymorphous inflammatory infiltrate with focal exuberant tissue eosinophilia. Ductal atrophy was seen with minimal squamous metaplasia. In all the cases, healing occurred without any further treatment in 3 weeks. No recurrence was observed.

CONCLUSION:

SANS is an uncommon, inflammatory condition of unknown etiology affecting minor salivary glands. SANS appears to be a self-limiting process that has distinct characteristic clinical and histologic features. Nevertheless, SANS shares some of the histologic features of early necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS), suggesting a possible relationship between the 2 conditions. Additional reporting of SANS would be helpful in better defining the condition and its delineation from NS.

PMID:
17142073
DOI:
10.1016/j.tripleo.2006.08.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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