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Clin Immunol. 2015 Mar;157(1):30-42. doi: 10.1016/j.clim.2014.12.010. Epub 2015 Jan 5.

The osteopontin transgenic mouse is a new model for Sjögren's syndrome.

Author information

1
The Elmezzi Graduate School of Molecular Medicine, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA; Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA.
2
Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA; Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Department of Dental Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, 270-05 76th Ave., New Hyde Park, NY 11040, USA; Department of Dental Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, 900 Fulton Avenue, Hempstead, NY 11550, USA; Department of Oral Biology, State University of New York at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine, 3435 Main Street, 211 Foster Hall, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA.
3
Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA; Robert S. Boas Center for Genomics and Human Genetics, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA.
4
Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA.
5
The Elmezzi Graduate School of Molecular Medicine, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA; Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA; Department of Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, 900 Fulton Avenue, Hempstead, NY 11550, USA; Department of Molecular Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, 900 Fulton Avenue, Hempstead, NY 11550, USA. Electronic address: tr@nshs.edu.

Abstract

Osteopontin (Opn) is a cytokine involved in both physiological and pathological processes, and is elevated in many autoimmune diseases. Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease with a strong female predilection characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of exocrine glands. We hypothesized that Opn contributes to SS pathogenesis. We examined an established SS model and found increased Opn locally and systemically. Next, we examined Opn transgenic (Opn Tg) mice for evidence of SS. Opn Tg animals exhibited lymphocytic infiltration of salivary and lacrimal glands, and Opn co-localized with the infiltrates. Moreover, saliva production was reduced, and SS autoantibodies were observed in the serum of these mice. Finally, female Opn Tg mice showed more severe disease compared to males. Taken together, these data support a role for Opn in SS pathogenesis. We identify a new model of spontaneous SS that recapitulates the human disease in terms of sex predilection, histopathology, salivary deficits, and autoantibodies.

KEYWORDS:

B cell; Osteopontin; Sialadenitis; Sjogren's syndrome

PMID:
25572532
PMCID:
PMC4357545
DOI:
10.1016/j.clim.2014.12.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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