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Building on the proceedings of the McGill conference: implant-retained overdentures in an area of South America. - PubMed - NCBI
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Implant Dent. 2008 Sep;17(3):288-98. doi: 10.1097/ID.0b013e318182ed65.

Building on the proceedings of the McGill conference: implant-retained overdentures in an area of South America.

Author information

1
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA. markiewm@ohsu.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Since the McGill consensus conference, numerous reports have proposed the advantages of the 2-implant-retained overdenture over the conventional denture in the restorative management of the edentulous mandible. The purpose of this article was to demonstrate the use of the 2-implant-retained overdenture in the restorative management of patients with edentulous mandibles in an impoverished population.

MATERIALS:

To address the study's purpose, the investigators initiated a retrospective cohort study and enrolled a sample of subjects who had mandibular 2-implant overdenture treatment using the protocol described within. The primary predictor variable was whether the patient had mandibular 2-implant overdenture treatment. The primary outcome variable was survival of mandibular 2-implantoverdenture treatment as defined within.

RESULTS:

The study sample included 35 patients each of whom had 2 mandibular implants placed for a total of 70 implants inserted with the purpose of retaining a mandibular overdenture. The mean clinical follow-up time was 74.7 months, during which there were no incidences of implant failure. Therefore, analytical and survival analyses could not be performed.

CONCLUSION:

Given the increase in quality of life and ease in implementation, clinicians should now be suggesting the mandibular 2-implant overdenture as the treatment of choice in the management of the edentulous mandible.

PMID:
18784529
DOI:
10.1097/ID.0b013e318182ed65
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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