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Clin Immunol. 2017 Sep;182:4-13. doi: 10.1016/j.clim.2017.04.003. Epub 2017 Apr 8.

Innate immunity in Sjögren's syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, United States.
2
Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, United States; Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, United States. Electronic address: jkramer@buffalo.edu.

Abstract

Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease of exocrine tissue that primarily affects women. Although patients typically experience xerostomia and xerophthalmia, numerous systemic disease manifestations are seen. Innate immune hyperactivity is integral to many autoimmune diseases, including SS. Results from SS mouse models suggest that innate immune dysregulation drives disease and this is a seminal event in SS pathogenesis. Findings in SS patients corroborate those in mouse models, as innate immune cells and pathways are dysregulated both in exocrine tissue and in peripheral blood. We will review the role of the innate immune system in SS pathogenesis. We will discuss the etiology of SS with an emphasis on innate immune dysfunction. Moreover, we will review the innate cells that mediate inflammation in SS, the pathways implicated in disease, and the potential mechanisms governing their dysregulation. Finally, we will discuss emerging therapeutic approaches to target dysregulated innate immune signaling in SS.

KEYWORDS:

A253; Innate immunity; Sjögren's syndrome; Submandibular gland; Toll-like receptor

PMID:
28396235
DOI:
10.1016/j.clim.2017.04.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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