University at Buffalo - The State University of New York
Skip to Content
Changes in Psychological Health and Subjective Well-Being Among Incarcerated Individuals With Serious Mental Illness. - PubMed - NCBI
Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Correct Health Care. 2016 Jan;22(1):12-20. doi: 10.1177/1078345815618200.

Changes in Psychological Health and Subjective Well-Being Among Incarcerated Individuals With Serious Mental Illness.

Author information

1
University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA Erie County Forensic Mental Health Services, Buffalo, NY, USA coreylei@buffalo.edu.
2
University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA.
3
Erie County Forensic Mental Health Services, Buffalo, NY, USA.
4
University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA Erie County Forensic Mental Health Services, Buffalo, NY, USA.
5
Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
6
University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA Erie County Forensic Mental Health Services, Buffalo, NY, USA New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

While improving the psychological health and well-being of individuals with serious mental illness can help reduce emotional distress and increase resilience, not enough is known about the well-being of incarcerated individuals with mental illness. Using the Schwartz Outcome Scale-10, the authors examined changes in subjective well-being and its association with other clinical symptoms and personality features in 43 mentally ill inmates in a large jail. All participants demonstrated significant improvement in general psychopathology and negative emotions. For well-being, however, different trajectories were associated with high versus low baseline ratings. Furthermore, those in the high well-being group were more likely to show features of aggression, dominance, hostility, mania, and more positive affect. These findings suggest that the level of well-being among inmates with serious mental illness may be an early indicator of personality features, clinical changes, and resilience, which is essential knowledge required when completing effective treatment planning.

KEYWORDS:

correctional mental health; inmate resilience; psychological health; serious mental illness; subjective well-being

PMID:
26672115
DOI:
10.1177/1078345815618200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center