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Excavating Neandertal and Denisovan DNA from the genomes of Melanesian individuals. - PubMed - NCBI
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Science. 2016 Apr 8;352(6282):235-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aad9416. Epub 2016 Mar 17.

Excavating Neandertal and Denisovan DNA from the genomes of Melanesian individuals.

Author information

1
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
2
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, Italy.
3
Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany.
4
Department of Anthropology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
5
Department of Biology and Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
6
Department of Anthropology, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, USA.
7
Institute for Medical Research, Goroka, Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea.
8
Department of Anthropology, Temple University, Philadelphia PA, USA.
9
Department of Statistics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
10
Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany. paabo@eva.mpg.de akeyj@uw.edu.
11
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. paabo@eva.mpg.de akeyj@uw.edu.

Abstract

Although Neandertal sequences that persist in the genomes of modern humans have been identified in Eurasians, comparable studies in people whose ancestors hybridized with both Neandertals and Denisovans are lacking. We developed an approach to identify DNA inherited from multiple archaic hominin ancestors and applied it to whole-genome sequences from 1523 geographically diverse individuals, including 35 previously unknown Island Melanesian genomes. In aggregate, we recovered 1.34 gigabases and 303 megabases of the Neandertal and Denisovan genome, respectively. We use these maps of archaic sequences to show that Neandertal admixture occurred multiple times in different non-African populations, characterize genomic regions that are significantly depleted of archaic sequences, and identify signatures of adaptive introgression.

PMID:
26989198
DOI:
10.1126/science.aad9416
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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